God’s supernatural love poured out for us

In my previous post, I revealed that I find myself falling short of being able to love my enemies and those I don’t like. But there is hope because God has provided us an answer to this problem of anger, bitterness, and hatred toward those we might find to be unlikable.

I want to talk more about what scripture calls agape love.  Agape is used in the original written language in scripture.  Our English translation for love in the bible doesn’t express the depth of the original meaning of Greek.

Agape love has a much deeper meaning.  It is more than “being nice,” which is from human effort or power.  We might tell our kids to “play nice.” We might put on a happy face when we are feeling angry inside and try to be nice.  This is not agape love.  First John 4:16 says:

“And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them.”

The words “God is love” goes far deeper in meaning than what we might see on the surface.   It cannot be contrived or manufactured. That’s the stuff of romance dramas, movies, or pop songs.  God’s agape love doesn’t come from us but it’s a “God thing.”  It originates from God alone.  It is what we need from God in order to love our enemies and those we find hard to love.

In my discovery of my own short-comings, I’ve realized that I need God’s agape love working in my life everyday to be able to love the unlikable.  God’s agape love is a supernatural love that’s given to us if we openly receive it from God first.  John taught us that we can love others because God has poured out his own supernatural love upon us first.  1 John 4 18-21 continues saying,

The one who fears is not made perfect in love.  We love because he first loved us.  Whoever claims to love God yet hates a brother or sister is a liar. For whoever does not love their brother and sister, whom they have seen, cannot love God, whom they have not seen.  And he has given us this command: Anyone who loves God must also love their brother and sister.

Personally, when I find people making it hard for me to like to like them, I need God’s agape love to make up for what I lack.  I need to remind myself that God wants to shower his tender grace and mercy upon me (and you too), and pour out his love upon me (and you) to love the unlovable.  All things are possible with God.

 

Loving unconditionally vs performance

A true and deep spirituality comprises more than living according to rules and keeping the law.  Some Christians would go as far as to label this a false religion.

People are searching for a deeper spirituality that involves love and acceptance.  If we have a shallow understanding of God’s gift of forgiveness, we might end up emphasizing performance over grace.   How well one follows rules/laws and do good deeds become a measure of our Christian spirituality. This fails to show how deep and wide is the love of God.

What’s worst is how this might influence the way we treat others, e.g., being judgmental and hypocritical toward others if we don’t match up to our standards of following the law.  This type of spirituality can feel very unsatisfying (and be unsustainable), especially if we’re on the receiving end of judgment.

This judgmentalism and performance type of Christianity paints a false picture of God’s love and acceptance of us as God’s children.  People have turned away from the church because of our hypocritical attitude towards them.  The sad thing–we who might be hypocrites may not even know it, and often, we’re too busy putting up a show of being moral.  It might be good for our image but bad for spiritual morale.

Paul said in First Thessalonians 1:3,

“We ought always to thank God for you, brothers and sisters, and rightly so, because your faith is growing more and more, and the love all of you have for one another is increasing.”

Jesus speaks of loving one another as a command (Gospel of John 13:34-35),

A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.”

For some ex-Christians who have left the church, the ability to believe in God’s unconditional love is where it stops. After failing to live rightly and justly, and having to repent over and over again for our same old sins, some of us just give up and no longer believe because we have not experienced the love of God through others.  We have been given a false image of a harsh God.

This is a lot of pressure we place upon ourselves and upon others.  It becomes an unsustainable spirituality, and possibly, even a false religion.  Where do we get this impression of God’s love being conditional?

If we have projected our moralism upon others, may we be humble enough to ask for God’s forgiveness. It might be a first step toward forgiveness, a deeper spirituality, and a better religion.  We can do better as Christians.