Have a Merry Christmas.

We celebrate the birth of Jesus who came to save the world and give a fresh start to all. Christmas is not about shopping at the malls for presents, buying and opening gifts, being with friends and family, a white “snowy” Christmas feeling, or even about singing Christmas carols. It is simply about the birth of Jesus Christ. No matter how we consumerize Christmas and hide the season behind a Santa Claus, reindeers, presents, or multi-colored lights, when it all comes down to it, and at the center of it , Christmas is about Jesus Christ. Have a Merry Christmas and a great new year in 2007.

Preaching that moves the heart and soul

Sermons preached from the pulpit are sometimes heard loud and clear, but most sermons are heard most loudly when it is done softly in the power of the Holy Spirit. Preaching empowered by the Spirit moves the heart and the soul to action, repentance, and submission to Jesus Christ. Dry intellectual-type of sermons like this overly-theological stuff on my blog doesn’t do much for the soul either. Finding the right balance is tricky sometimes. Perhaps a preaching style with a combination of John Wesley, Charles Finney… and Veggie Tales might work? (photo: Rev. John Wesley, a revivalist preacher)

Why does society seem void of common sense?

How do we return back to some common sense? Secular society has become a God-less society rathering than a God-blessed society. It has rejected the logos, which makes possible our ability to grasp and shape reality, therefore, one’s technical reasoning becomes empty, and prone to corruption. Without the “revelation” from the logos, modern society cannot grasp values, meanings, structures and processes. Through modern philosophy’s rejection of classical reason and the logos in return for empty technical reason, society cannot possibly “reason” without the insight of “revelation”. Our modern secular philosophy has rejected classical reasoning (or ontological reason) in the classrooms. Theologians like Paul Tillich would likely say that we need to return to using classical reason in the classrooms. It’s easier said than done. Our secularized public university system has rejected religious philosophy and has “cleaned out” all concepts of the logos word in the name of emancipation–“freedom from religion” instead of “freedom of religion”. How tragic! How do we return to some common sense? We need to make incremental changes in the classrooms of society, and through prayer for our nation (and hope we don’t caught for praying publicly in a public place!). (photo: U.S. Supreme Court; Canadian Parliament)

Is social justice for Christians

Why do Christians relegate justice issues to the backburner? Social justice issues like looking out for the marginalized in society as the psalmist speaks of in Psalm 82:3-4 show the importance of the environment, administering justice to the weak, the orphan, the needy, and protecting the rights of the lowly, and the destitute. God will issue judgement upon the rulers as Psalm 82:1 shows us. The word for judge “shafat” in Hebrew is in the imperative, which has connotations implying: “do it!” God seems to take it seriously. If so, will our political leaders be held accountable by God to the injustices people suffer even today? Will Christians also be held responsible? If we all start to take responsibility, individually, and corporately as churches, we can make a more just, fair, and equitable society, even without government intervention. (see thepeaceplan.com) (bottom: These lovely women in Llappa, Peru are fighting against the gold mining companies’ destructive mining practices which is destroying their farmland and drinking water with toxic chemicals. Their sole source of income and health is being jeopardized without any compensation, or acknowledgment from the Peruvian government)

My personal reformation by the Word and Spirit

How do we experience a personal reformation? By hearing the teaching, the preaching and by experiencing the sacrament of the living word who is Jesus Christ. This has been my personal experience. As one hears the living active word, the Holy Spirit awakens faith within a person’s spiritual inner being. The Holy Spirit arouses our inner spirit-being to be regenerated, bringing new life. One will never be the same again. This is what Martin Luther calls regeneration; today’s evangelicals call it being “born again”. Luther actually said: “It was like I was born again.” Though some Lutherans will deny that regeneration is not the same as being “born again”, it really is the same thing but using different words. It is all semantics; however, the evangelical definition of “born again” has connotations of evangelicalism. Thus, Lutherans seem to want to keep the definition of “regeneration” distinct–but it is actually the same thing. Evangelicals have an easier time pointing back to an experience they can remember; whereas, Lutherans are called to “remember their baptism” as a continual everyday thing. (see my posting on Dec. 28, 2006) [photo: Watchman Nee who in 1952 was imprisoned for his faith, tortured and beaten black & blue; he remained in prison until his death in 1972. His words remain an abundant source of spiritual revelation and supply to Christians throughout the world.]

Which Radical Reformation is coming?

The “Coming Radical Reformation” that was supposed to put Christianity on its knees has not come in this age and probably won’t in future ages either. I believe there is a personal God external to human beings as opposed to Robert Funk’s “God of the metaphysical age is dead” idea. Sure the de-literalization of the creation story might be agreeable to many…even to some evangelicals but most of Funk’s “21 Theses” are considered too radical and unorthodox biblicalto most Christians, even to liberal scholars. Does God still interfere with the order of nature from time to time? Sure. Miracles are not so unbelievable given the amount of testimonials out there by ordinary people around the world, especially from Christians in developing countries. What causes our unbelief is our lack of contact with the ordinary folks who experience the supernatural. Perhaps we should not be so quick to judge those who have experienced God in a real and tangible way. One’s subjective opinion cannot invalidate one’s personal experience of the Holy Spirit; nor can one’s lack of experience of God’s supernatural essence validate the non-existence of God. The fact that we live and move and have our being is a miracle in itself. Funk’s christology of Jesus as non-divine human being is an attempt to demote Jesus to the status of a demi-god or mere prophet. This would certainly please the Jehovah Witnesses and Muslims but the onus is still on R. Funk and the nontraditionalists to prove that Jesus is not divine. It will take much more proof to disprove the traditional beliefs of historic Christianity, which has been handed down to us through the centuries. Funk’s disbelief in the virgin birth of Jesus doesn’t cause as big of a stir to traditional Christian theology. I don’t think traditionalists should have much to fear even with a change of wording of Isa. 7:14 from “virgin” to “young woman”. Things like these are really the non-essentials of the faith. It will take a much greater pardigmatic shift in theological opinion to subvert the traditional wording of the Creed. (The Good News bible and N/RSV translations switched to “young woman” rather than “virgin”; but the NIV, TNIV, ESV, and modern translations have remained the same.)