Eating and drinking out of faith

The apostle Paul was very sensitive toward the conscience of fellow believers–especially those who were new believers in Christ.  Recent converts to Christ would have experienced a new-found freedom in Christ.  They came from either strict Judaism where rules and regulations binded them, and if from paganism, Gentiles would have had little or no rules. Jewish beliefs about eating non-kosher food or drinking alcohol would have diverged from Gentile beliefs.  Thus, the church may have been quite diverse.

Paul instructed Christians in Romans 14:20-23,

“Do not destroy the work of God for the sake of food. All food is clean, but it is wrong for a person to eat anything that causes someone else to stumble. It is better not to eat meat or drink wine or to do anything else that will cause your brother or sister to fall.  So whatever you believe about these things keep between yourself and God. Blessed is the one who does not condemn himself by what he approves. But whoever has doubts is condemned if they eat, because their eating is not from faith; and everything that does not come from faith is sin.”

I am reminded about my fellow brothers and sisters of Asian cultures who eat solidified pigs blood (blood curd) like my Filipino friends.  Deuteronomy 12:23 advises not to eat pig’s blood,

But be sure you do not eat the blood, because the blood is the life, and you must not eat the life with the meat.

What about after it’s been cooked?  When I was a younger Christian, I would have judged because others in the church were judgemental.  I guess it was a form of devout piety and a sincere but twisted desire to bind others with biblical rules.  Today that’s changed. Hopefully, some of the church is changing too. Does this mean I’m going to start eating blood curd? No. It’s just not in my taste in food. But I do love eating pork chops, pork cutlets, and pork bone soup (Korean). Yum yum.

The freedom that we are given frees us from the consequences of external laws–liturgical and ceremonial law.  It is the life of the Spirit in which we live–the interior life–which is not visible to human eyes but is spiritually discerned.

Laws are not disregarded or thrown out.  Laws are holy and good because they are given by God and inform us of what is moral and ethical.  They inform us that we are still sinners; while the gospel transforms us into saints.  Laws help correct us and steer us toward living a better life but they do not save us.  We thank God for good laws, but we also thank God more for freedom in the Spirit.

God’s election of a predestined group

 

St Paul Cathedral, London UK

The debate about Calvinism vs Arminianism sometimes center around the issue of predestination.  Everyone believes that God does predestine, but to what extent are we predestined to?  God has predestined that Christ should live within the believer in order to be saved, but the question is: Does God predestine a certain chosen or elected smaller remnant of people to be saved?  Scripture seems to point to this.

Certainly Israel was chosen, as the Apostle Paul points out here in Romans 8:28-30,

“And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters. And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified.” (Rom. 8:28-30, NIV)

Calvinists would say that predestination is explicit in this passage of scripture, however, Arminians would interpret this verse to imply that God’s prevenient grace is universally offered to all people, regardless of whether or not they’ve heard the gospel. In a way, this grace also renders the person “neutral” so that they can decide themselves whether to accept or reject Christ (see Monergism).

In the Old Testament, Paul quoted Moses and makes it clear that only a remnant will be saved to continue on as the surviving and true Israel,

“For not all who are descended from Israel are Israel. Nor because they are his descendants are they all Abraham’s children…” (Rom. 9:6-8)

Furthermore, the argument of whether God is truly merciful or not is clear in the Old Testament. Paul quotes Moses from Exodus 33:19,

“I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion.” (Rom 9:14)

This begs us to wonder: “What if my son or daughter, brother or sister, is neither predestined or called by God?”  Ouch.  A loving father, mother, sibling or spouse, would feel a deep heart-ache if they knew that their loved one was not predestined to be with the Lord on the Last Day.

Another question might be: What about all the other millions of people around the world who have never had the opportunity to hear the gospel of Jesus?  Are they not predestined to be saved?

I still have unanswered questions, but for me, come what may, I still believe that God is a sovereign God and will place my bets on God’s mercy, grace and love.